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Proving Ground Demonstrations
Home  |  SPC/HWT  |  NHC  |  AWC  |  OPC/HPC  |  AQ  |  High Latitude and Arctic Experiment
Aviation Weather Testbed:  Aviation Weather Center
Aviation Weather Experiments:  2012 | 2011
Additional Aviation Weather Product Examples
 
2012 Aviation Weather Experiment

Image:  Low Cloud and Fog
2011 Aviation Weather Experiment
Image:  Low Cloud and Fog
Additional Aviation Weather Product Examples
Volcanic Ash Product Suite    
     
Chile's Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Volcano erupted on June 4, 2011, forming a tall ash plume above the Andes Mountains.
   
The GOES-R Proving Ground provides near real-time volcanic ash retrieval products (using Meteosat SEVIRI data as a proxy for the GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager) to identify a significant volcanic ash plume emerging over the Atlantic Ocean impacting aviation operations with many cancelled flights.
   
Similar data was provided by STAR to the London Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC) during the eruption of Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland in May 2010.
   
 
image:  Chile's Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Volcano eruption
Chile's Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Volcano eruption
Example courtesy of Mike Pavolonis – NESDIS/STAR
Fog Detection (Future Capability)

The GOES-R fog detection product will significantly improve geostationary satellite fog monitoring capabilities:

Improved algorithm technology - the GOES-R algorithm provides quantitative information on fog probability, while heritage GOES fog detection products are more qualitative in nature
Improved sensor technology - the ABI has greatly improved spectral information, spatial resolution, and temporal resolution
image:  Fog Detection image

Example courtesy of CIMSS/STAR

Clear Air Turbulence
Clear Air Turbulence can be a significant aircraft hazard, occasionally causing injuries and long delays.
   
At the upper-tropospheric boundary between air masses, vertical shearing at the jet stream combined with the ageostrophic convergence of polar, subtropical and stratospheric air produces a region known for its potential for clear air turbulence called a “tropopause fold.”
   
Water vapor imagery can be used to infer large changes in vertical motion that can herald the presence of turbulence in the atmosphere.
   
The Tropopause Folding Turbulence Prediction (TFTP) product locates these regions in the atmosphere and identifies the sections most likely to produce turbulent flight conditions for aircraft.
   
 
GOES Water Vapor Imagery and turbulence reports - Example courtesy of CIMSS
GOES Water Vapor Imagery and turbulence reports - Example courtesy of CIMSS
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