MULTIMEDIA: Proving Ground

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Overshooting Tops: GOES-14 SRSOR on August 9, 2016:

This three panel animation compares GOES-14 Super Rapid Scan Operations for GOES-R (SRSOR) one-minute imagery (center) compared to current GOES-15 (left) and GOES-13 (right) imagery. The GOES-14 one-minute imagery clearly shows the rapidly-changing overshooting tops associated with a severe thunderstorm in southeast Montana on August 9, 2016. The National Weather Service forecast office in Billings, Montana, utilized this special imagery to issue a severe storm warning and credited the SRSOR data with making the warning decision process much easier. This imagery was particularly valuable for this storm because the area has poor radar coverage below 10,000 feet. Download Original Credit: CIMSS

Himawari-8 2.5 Minute Imagery: the Eye of Super Typhoon Nepartak:

This 2.5-minute rapid scan animation from the Japan Meteorological Agency’s Himwari-8 satellite shows Super Typhoon Nepartak churning through the northwest Pacific Ocean on July 7, 2016. At the time of the animation, Nepartak had intensified to a category 5 hurricane equivalent and was bearing down on Taiwan with maximum sustained winds of 145 knots (166 miles per hour). The Himawari-8 satellite carries an Advanced Himawari Imager, which is very similar to the GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager. This animation highlights the spatial resolution that will be available from GOES-R. The ability to see such detail in the eye of the storm is very important to forecasters. The view inside the eye can help determine if there is dry air eroding the storm, signaling potential weakening. The eye location is also important for tracking the storm. GOES-R will be able to scan even faster than Himwari-8, as often as every 30 seconds for targeted areas of severe weather. Download Original Credit: Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere

Convective Initiation: GOES-14 SRSOR on May 9, 2016:

This animation from May 9, 2016 shows GOES-14 one-minute Super Rapid Scan Operations for GOES-R (SRSOR) visible imagery of convection in southern Oklahoma. The animation pauses three times to show annotations that highlight how the one-minute imagery allows one to see a first attempt at convective initiation that fails, and the mid-level cloud detaches from its updraft, resulting in an "orphan anvil." The second attempt at convective initiation succeeds and goes on to produce a tornadic supercell. The highlighted storm in the loop produced an EF-4 tornado near Hennepin, Oklahoma. The one-minute imagery allowed forecasters to see the overshooting tops as they occurred in near real-time and helped them determine which storms had the strongest updrafts right away. Download Original Credit: Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere

GOES-14 SRSOR Shortwave Infrared Imagery of Grassfire:

A comparison of GOES-15, GOES-14 and GOES-13 Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images on April 18, 2016 demonstrates the advantage of 1-minute super rapid scan over the routine 15-minute routine scan interval for characterizing the intensity and trends of a short-lived grassfire in far western Oklahoma. GOES-14 was operating in Super Rapid Scan Operations for GOES-R (SRSOR) mode. Even though a fire hot spot (yellow color enhancement) appeared on the “2000 UTC” GOES-15 and GOES-13 images, the actual scan time of the fire for those 2 satellites was 2004 and 2003 UTC, respectively; a fire hot spot of 317.2 K was first detected on the 2101 UTC GOES-14 image. The magnitude of the fire hot spot then quickly increased to 332.8 K (red color enhancement) on the 2005 UTC GOES-14 image; the short-term fluctuations in the intensity of the fire hot spot were only adequately captured by the 1-minute super rapid scan interval of the GOES-14 images. Download Original Credit: Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies

Strong Winter Storm over the upper Ohio River Valley:

A strong winter storm produced a swath of winter weather from Arkansas through lower Michigan on February 23-24, 2016. GOES-14 SRSOR one-minute imagery was centered on the occluded storm on February 24, and this water vapor animation shows strong flow north-northwest from the Mid-Atlantic states into the Upper Midwest, where winter storm and blizzard warnings were widespread. The end of the animation shows strong convection developing over the Mid-Altantic states where multiple reports of severe weather occurred. The special one-minute imagery simulates faster scanning abilities of the GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager. Download Original Credit: Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies

Himawari-8 Aleutian Low:

This two-day GeoColor movie, taken from Japan’s Himawari-8 satellite, shows a massive Aleutian low moving into the Bering Sea on December 12-13, 2015.The storm had an estimated atmospheric pressure among the lowest on record for the northern Pacific. The lowest barometric pressure in the storm was estimated to be 924 millibars at 9 p.m. Alaska time on December 12 according to an analysis done by NOAA's Ocean Prediction Center. This ties a Bering Sea storm in November of 2014 with the same lowest estimated pressure. The Himawari-8 satellite carries an Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI), which is very similar to the GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI). Imagery from Himawari-8’s AHI is being used to prepare users for the capabilities that will be available from the ABI. Download Original Credit: Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere

Preparing for GOES-R at NOAA’s Hazardous Weather Testbed:

NOAA satellite experts and weather forecasters worked together at the Hazardous Weather Testbed (HWT). This video highlights the work done from May 4 to June 12, 2015. NOAA invited National Weather Service forecasters and paired them with TV broadcast meteorologists to evaluate the new science, technology and products that will be available from the GOES-R satellite once launched. Download Original | Transcript Credit: NASA Goddard Media Studio

Gridded PGLM and 1-minute SRSOR imagery from GOES-14:

This animation from August 10, 2015, shows GOES-14 one-minute Super Rapid Scan Operation for GOES-R (SRSOR) visible imagery with pseudo Geostationary Lightning Mapper gridded data overlaid in the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) network for an area of developing convection. The animation also includes Aircraft Situation Display to Industry (ASDI) flight tracking in the Southeast U.S. Download Original Credit: Aviation Weather Center

Tornadic Thunderstorm over Eastern Colorado, May 27, 2015:

A tornado was reported near Yuma, Colorado, at 1910 UTC on 27 May 2015. GOES-14 was in SRSOR (Super Rapid Scan Operations for GOES-R) scanning mode, and a storm-centered animation of the visible imagery (0.626 µm) is shown here. The tornado occurred early in the life of the supercell on which the animation centers. Download Original Credit: Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies

GOES-14 SRSO Visible Imagery over West Texas, May 20, 2015:

Intersecting boundaries fueled the development of an isolated thunderstorm over northeastern Andrews County in west Texas. This one-minute visible imagery was captured by GOES-14 when operating in SRSOR (Super Rapid Scan Operations for GOES-R) mode. Download Original Credit: Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies

GOES-14 One-Minute Visible Imagery of Hurricane Marie from August 25, 2014:

The GOES-14 satellite was in Super Rapid Scan Operations for GOES-R (SRSOR) mode, providing 1-minute interval images of Category 4 intensity Hurricane Marie over the Eastern Pacific Ocean on August 25, 2014. For additional real-time imagery, visit http://rammb.cira.colostate.edu/dev/lindsey/loops/ and http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/srsor2014/GOES-14_SRSOR.html. | Download Original Credit: Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies

GOES-14 One-Minute Visible Imagery of River Valley Fog Dissipation on August 20, 2014:

The GOES-14 satellite was in Super Rapid Scan Operations for GOES-R (SRSOR) mode, providing images at 1-minute intervals over the central US on August 20, 2014; an animation of 0.63 µm visible channel images showed the dissipation of river valley fog that had formed during the previous night over the Mississippi River and adjacent portions of southwestern Wisconsin, southeastern Minnesota, and northeastern Iowa. The 3 panels show images every 15 minutes (today’s current routine schedule), every 5 minutes (available during Rapid Scan Operations), and every 1 minute (which will be available from the ABI instrument on the next-generation GOES-R satellite). For more information and additional imagery from the 2014 GOES-14 SRSOR campaign, visit http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/srsor2014/GOES-14_SRSOR.html | Download Original Credit: Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies

Tropical Storm Lowell as seen by one-minute GOES-14 imagery on August 19, 2014:

The GOES-14 satellite, in Super Rapid Scan Operations for GOES-R (SRSOR) mode, provided coverage of Tropical Storm Lowell in the Eastern Pacific Ocean on August 19, 2014; an animation of 0.63 µm visible channel one-minute imagery showed a gradual increase in the organization of a convective banding structure during the day. For more information and additional imagery from the 2014 GOES-14 SRSOR campaign, visit http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/srsor2014/GOES-14_SRSOR.html | Download Original Credit: Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies

GOES-14 SRSOR:  Automated Detection of Overshooting Tops:

This three-panel animation shows visible imagery from GOES-14 and shows the difference between standard or routine 15-minute interval, 5-7 minute interval Rapid Scan Operations (RSO), and 1-minute interval Super Rapid Scan Operations Mode for GOES-R (SRSO) 0.63 µm visible channel images for the rapidly-developing convection that produced two separate tornadoes in southern Minnesota on May 8, 2014. This example highlights the fact that the formation and evolution of the rapidly-developing convection was much more evident and easy to follow with the one-minute imagery. For more information and additional imagery from the 2014 GOES-14 SRSOR campaign, visit http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/srsor2014/GOES-14_SRSOR.html | Download Original Credit: Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies

GOES-R Rapid Refresh- 1-min Imagery and Lightning Mapping Array:

By combining special GOES-14 Super Rapid Scan imagery with the Washington, DC Lightning Mapping Array (DCLMA) as proxy for the GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) and Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) respectively, this animation from a severe weather event on June 13, 2013 provides weather forecasters and broadcast meteorologists a glimpse of what will be available in the GOES-R era. The tracks and locations of two tornados (red lines/circles) are overlaid to highlight the important relationship between lightning activity and severe storms. Additional Information. | Download Original Credit: Cooperative Institute for Climate Stdies, University of Maryland

Hurricane Sandy Super Rapid Scan Operations Visible Imagery:

A special 1-minute Super Rapid Scan Operations Experiment for GOES-R (SRSOR) took place August – October 2012 while GOES-14 was out of storage. This was a unique opportunity to combine rapid scan imagery and demonstrate the future capabilities of the Advanced Baseline Imager and Geostationary Lightning Mapper. This animation shows visible 1-minute SRSOR imagery for Hurricane Sandy from October 25‒-31, 2012. For additional GOES-14 SRSOR 1-min imagery, visit http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/srsor/GOES-14_SRSOR.html. | Download Original Credit: Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies

IMAGES: Proving Ground

The GOES-R and JPSS Satellite Proving Ground is a collaborative effort between the GOES-R and JPSS Program Offices, the National Weather Service (NWS), NOAA, NASA and other academic and educational institutions. The Proving Ground engages NWS in pre-operational demonstrations of selected capabilities of next generation geostationary and polar-orbiting satellite products. The Proving Ground is a project in which simulated GOES-R and JPSS products can be tested and evaluated before the satellites are launched. Intended outcomes are day one readiness and maximum utilization of GOES-R and JPSS products and an effective transition to operations.

Local High Resolution Image Links:

This section mirrors the Flickr gallery above but contains links to only HIGH RESOLUTION LOCAL (to our server as opposed to Flickr) images. It functions as a 'one click' quick access to the highest resolution version of each image as well as back up in the event Flickr is down.